Books and Videos

THE GERMAN-JEWISH EMIGRATION OF THE 1930S AND ITS IMPACT ON CHICAGO
Publications Committee Chairman: Roberta L. Bernstein. Editor: Curtis C. Melnick. 1980. Report on the CJHS symposium held at Congregation Ezra-Habonim on November 18, 1979. Illustrated with black and white photographs. 24 pages. Paper $4.00

THE CHICAGO JEWISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY: A Ten Year History
Edited by Irwin J. Suloway. 1988. Illustrated with black and white photographs. 24 pages. Paper $4.00

CHICAGO JEWISH HISTORY: 1977–Present
Single copies of the Society's quarterly journal. 2013. Each $4.00 Specify issue.
Issue  

CHICAGO JEWISH HISTORY: INDEX 1977–2002
Compiled and edited by Adele Hast. 2002. Covers the first twenty-five years of the CJHS quarterly journal. Paper $4.00

CJHS MINSKY FUND PRIZE WINNERS
Doris Minsky was a founder, director, and officer of the Society. The Fund was established in her memory for the purpose of publishing monographs on the history of the Jews of Chicago. Submissions were judged and cash prizes were awarded by the CJHS Publications Committee.

Volume One: 1991
CHICAGO JEWISH STREET PEDDLERS
By Carolyn Eastwood. Illustrated with drawings. MEMORIES OF LAWNDALE. By Beatrice Michaels Shapiro. Illustrated with photos. Total 103 pages. Paper $5.00

Volume Two: 1993
THE CHAYDER, THE YESHIVA, AND I
By Morris Springer. Recollections of Hebrew school and the Hebrew Theological College. MEMORIES OF THE MANOR. By Eva Gross. Reminiscences of growing up Jewish in Chicago's Jeffrey Manor neighborhood. Illustrated with photos. Total 95 pages. Paper $5.00

Volume Three: 1996
THE CANTORS: Gifted Voices Remembered
By Bea Kraus. Chicago was well-known for her fine congregational cantors and the world-famous vocal artists engaged for the High Holy Days. Illustrated with photos. 85 pages. Paper $5.00

Volume Four: 1997
MY FATHER, MYSELF
By Rabbi Alex J. Goldman. A son's memoir of his father, Yehudah D. Goldman, America's oldest practicing rabbi. Illustrated with photos. 120 pages. Paper $5.00

Volume Five: 2001
THROUGH THE EYES OF THEIR CHILDREN
By Myron H. Fox. A riveting account of Chicago's bloody taxi wars of the 1920s and the author's research into the victimization of his taxi driver father. Illustrated with photos. 160 pages. paper $5.00

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LOOKING BACKWARD: True Stories from Chicago's Jewish Past
By Walter Roth. 2002. The unknown story of Jewish participation in Chicago's great fair of 1893 is only one of the fascinating nuggets of history unearthed and polished by Walter Roth in the pages of our quarterly journal, Chicago Jewish History. The material chronicles events and people from the late 1800s to the end of WWII. Illustrated. Paper, 305 pages. Direct from CJHS at Special Price $10.00
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AVENGERS AND DEFENDERS: Glimpses of Chicago's Jewish Past
By Walter Roth. 2008. The second collection of articles from CJH by President Emeritus Roth, who conveys his justifiable pride in the productive immigrants, refugees, and native-born Jews who enriched the life of Chicago. The "avenger" is Sholom Schwartzbard, who assassinated Simon Petliura, whose followers had perpetrated the pogroms in the Ukraine after World War I . Illustrated. Paper, 235 pages. Direct from CJHS at Special Price $10.00
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AN ACCIDENTAL ANARCHIST. By Walter Roth & Joe Kraus
1998. How the killing of a humble Jewish Immigrant by Chicago's Chief of Police exposed the conflict between law and order and civil rights in early 20th century America. The episode took place on a cold Chicago morning in March 1908. Lazarus Averbuch, a 19-year-old Jewish immigrant, knocked on the door of the home of Police Chief George Shippy. Minutes later, the boy lay dead, shot by Shippy himself. Why Averbuch went there and exactly what happened afterward is still not known. The book does not solve the mystery, rather the authors examine the many different perspectives and concerns that surrounded the investigation of Averbuch's killing. Hardcover, 212 pages. Direct from CJHS at Special Price $15.00
DVD: REFUGE: STORIES OF THE SELFHELP HOME: A Film by Ethan Bensinger
Refuge reaches back more than 70 years to give voice to the last generation of Jewish victims of Nazi persecution. The film traces the lives of Holocaust survivors and refugees who today live in Chicago at Selfhelp, a home that has provided refuge for more than 1,000 elderly Central European Jews since the end of World War II. Told through the eyewitness experiences of Selfhelp's residents and founders, this is the story of remarkable courage and resilience. 60 minutes. $25.00 When purchased direct from CJHS, $5.00 of price is donated to the Society.


These items can also be purchased by check to The Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 610 South Michigan Avenue, Room 803, Chicago, IL 650605-1901.